Mace Oil – Significant Spice

Mace essential oil is one wonderful essential oil that deals with quite a lot many internal and external problems of the human body very effectively. The oil is absolutely pure and that can be owed to the fact that the souce of the oil is strong and pure.

Mace essential oil, can be used for flatulent dyspepsia, nausea, diarrhea, dysentery and rheumatism. Both Mace and Nutmeg help digestion in stomach weakness, but if used in excess may cause over-excitement. They increase circulation and body heat. They have been employed in pestilential and putrid fevers, and with other substances in intermittent fevers, and enter into the composition of many French medicaments.

The fruits, smooth and yellow, resemble a pear grooved by a longitudinal furrow and containing a single erect seed about 1 1/4 inches long. The nucleus being the wrinkled nutmeg. The fleshy, irregular covering, scarlet when fresh and drying, yellow and brittle, is the mace. The essential oil is made by steam (or water) distillation of the dried orange-brown aril or husk.

Mace the tree is a small evergreen, not more than 40 feet in height, with smooth, grayish-brown bark, green on the younger branches. The alternate leaves are -Oblong-ovate

  • Acute
  • Entire
  • Smooth
  • Dark-green

The flowers are very small and unisexual.

Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) has been used for centuries, particularly as a remedy for kidney and digestive problems; nutmeg oil is obtained from an evergreen tree of the Myristicaeae plant family. The tree grows up to sixty five feet in height with small, yellow flowers and fruit, shaped like a small peach; the bark of the tree is smooth and gray-brown in color. It is native to the Molucca Islands and cultivated in the West Indies, Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

Ancient Indian and Chinese royalty carried ground nutmeg in small, ivory boxes and added the substance to drinks for hallucinogenic reasons; in Malaysia, pregnant women used nutmeg in the final weeks of their confinement in the belief it would strengthen the uterine muscle for labor. The Romans used nutmeg to make incense.

Nutmeg was a valuable spice for trading; both the British and the French smuggled nutmeg seeds in the eighteenth century. By the nineteenth century, ground nutmeg was being used in many English recipes; it became a popular addition to Christmas eggnog in the United States.

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Mace info by www.drugs.com
  2. Mace and nutmeg fruit by Spices
  3. Mace by Mrs.M.Grieve

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