Mace Oil’s Composition

Mace essential oil is a very potent combination of wonderful compounds that elevate the goodness of the oil, notches higher. The oil is highly antiseptic in nature and is often recommended for preparing healthy and healing recipes.

It is thought that the ancients knew nutmeg and mace, but by the twelfth century, the spices had definitely reached the Mediterranean, brought by Arab traders. Not long after, the School of Salerno recorded the poisonous effect of using too much nutmeg; they praised its cardiac effects, but recorded haemorrhage and fatalities if used in large doses. ‘Unica nux prodest, nocet altera, tertia necat’ (One nut is good, another is less good, the third kills).

For years, both spices were the monopoly of first the Portuguese and then the Dutch, until Pierre Poivre smuggled some young trees from the Spice Islands. When the Moluccas were part of the British Empire, trees were transplanted to the West Indies, where they thrived.

In the eighteenth century, nutmeg and mace were included in French codices and in the nineteenth century, Pulligny wrote a book of876 pages entirely devoted to the nutmeg tree and its spices.

In folk medicine, carrying a nutmeg in the pocket is reputedly a cure for lumbago and rheumatism.

Nutmeg oil and mace oil both contain myristicine, with small quantities of -

  • Borneol
  • Camphene
  • Cymol
  • Dipentenegeraniol
  • Linalool
  • Pinene
  • Sapol
  • Terpineol
  • Acetic
  • Butyric
  • Caprilic
  • Formic
  • Myristic acids

The main producers of the oils are the USA, Canada and Singapore (of nutmeg respectively 20 – 30 tonnes, 5 – 10 tonnes, and 1 – 2 tonnes per year, 1987 figures). The USA is the largest consumer of nutmeg oil (30 tonnes), followed by Britain with 10 tonnes.

Nutmeg oil is steam-distilled from nuts crushed to a butter; oil from the islands is re-distilled in France to improve the quality. Mace is steam-distilled from the arils. Both oils are similar, very pale yellow and very fluid. Nutmeg smells spicy, pleasant and hot, mace very strongly spicy. Both oils change as they become old, turning dark brown and smelling disagreeable, acidic and turpentine-like – do not buy or use if like this.

Have a look at our reference links now -

  1. Mace info by www.drugs.com
  2. Mace and nutmeg fruit by Spices
  3. Mace by Mrs.M.Grieve

Chef’s Favourite Spice – Mace

Whenever my mom used to mutton stew…I saw her secretly adding this powder to it…and the taste of the dish and its aroma…used to be wild-hunger-instigating…There were certain aunts whose lives revolved around their kitchen and food…they kept prodding mom to disclose to them the complete recipe of the stew to which mom modestly pretended to shy away and fobbed them off saying there was nothing special or unusual about the dish…

 I was never a kitchen person…so tho’ I knew there always was something ‘special’ in mom’s ‘usual’ dishes…but never bothered to ask…But today when I have to cook myself…I realize…I should’ve asked mom her ‘secret’ spice… 

And again…I feel it’s okay…what are search engines for? Laying the ins and outs in front of you at just a click…And that’s exactly how I got to know about this spice called ‘Mace’… 

I’ll brief you about this wonderful and now a part of my secret pack of ‘spices’…Mace is the aril (it’s the bright red…lacy covering) of the nutmeg seed shell…The mace actually is removed from the shell and its broken parts that are called blades…And it’s a fact that the past of mace is closely tied to the history of nutmeg…though the two items have been treated separately…Because the yield of mace is much less than nutmeg’s it has had greater value…A pile of fruit large enough to make one hundred pounds of nutmeg produces a single pound of mace… 

I think I should brief you of its related history simultaneously…It’s of the time when the Dutch controlled the Moluccas (the Spice Islands)…one colonial administrator sent orders that the colonists should plant fewer nutmeg trees and more mace trees…Reason being…Mace had made a market and place for itself…
I am sure you must be eager to know about the itself now…hmm…Well…In its natural state…mace is a bright crimson lace up to 35 mm long…encasing the brown nutmeg in irregular…fleshy lobes…As it is dries…it develops its characteristic aroma but loses its bright red colour…Mace from the West Indies is a yellowish brown colour and with fewer holes than mace from East Indian nutmegs which are more orange when dried….The mace from either locale can become brittle and horny…though the best quality mace will retain some pliability and release a  little oil when squeezed…It is also sold ground and sometimes  still enclosing the nutmeg…

There is not much of preservations needed for this ultimate spice…Dried mace pieces are not easy to crush….Ready-ground mace is easier to use…but will deteriorate much more quickly…Whole mace pieces can be steeped in liquid and then the liquid can be used…or the mace pieces can be removed after cooking…You know just one ‘blade’ is strong enough to add taste to a meal of almost four to six portions….

You won’t be surprised to know…Like I mentioned initially…Mace and nutmeg are very similar…though mace is somewhat more powerful…Mace is a lighter colour and can be used in  light-coloured dishes where the darker flecks of nutmeg would be undesirable….A small amount will enhance many recipes…adding fragrance without imposing too much taste…Mace works especially well with milk dishes like custards and cream  sauces…It contributes to flavouring light-coloured cakes and pastries…especially donuts…Mace is an exotic spice…It can enhance clear and creamed  soups and casseroles…chicken pies and sauces…Adding some to mashed potatoes or sweet potatoes creates a more interesting  side dish…Some beverages improve with a little mace…especially chocolate drinks and tropical punches…

Phew! That’s too much work for one little spice…But bravo…I love it

Okay…Go through the content of our reference links now…

  1. Mace Recipes by about.com
  2. History of Mace Spice by Peggy Trowbridge Filippone
  3. Mace…Indian Spice by indanetzone

Meeting With Mace Essential Oil

Does anyone of you have the slightest of idea as to what all we are flushed with on this earth?

Frankly even I was amongst the ones who used to watch movies like ‘Anaconda’ and maybe ‘Alice in Wonderland’ and even Discovery channel and kept wondering of the kind of vegetation that grew on earth thousands of years ago…the magical herbs it bore that would cure today’s all incurable chronic fatal diseases…like cancer…just to name a few…I have always dreaded the disease..Anyway…

What I was trying to explain is that…years from those times…I now realize that those weren’t just movies…but rather a glimpse of the unseen…something that did exist…

Mace essential oil…Now getting to the point…You know this Mace Essential Oil has a long-long history of medical use…It was used to combat digestive issues and fevers…Just a harmless growing herb…that has been hidden from the human eye for many years…

Okay…these are some of its key information…that you should know about the this oil..before I go down to the nitty-gritty of it…

  1. Its Botanical Name is Myristica fragrans
  2. Its most common Method Of Extraction is Steam distillation
  3. Its parts Used is Aril
  4. Its Note Classification is the Middle
  5. Its aroma is bright…warm…spicy
  6. Largest Producing Countries of it are Sri Lanka…Indonesia and West Indies

This oil has been traditionally used as a flavouring agent for baked goods and pharmaceuticals…Also used in perfumery as an addition to men’s fragrances…

It is by nature-

  • Anti rheumatic
  • Antispasmodic
  • Analgesic
  • Antioxidant
  • Stimulant
  • Tonic
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Carminative
  • Choloagogue
  • Laxative

Be it…Arthritis…colds…constipation…cough…exhaustion…fever… flatulence…halitosis…loss of appetite…muscle fatigue…nausea…slow circulation….Added to a blend…mace oil is used as a fixative….Its analgesic properties may be used topically for muscle fatigue and arthritis….

Not only all those…Mace essential oil…can be used for flatulent dyspepsia…nausea…diarrhoea…dysentery and rheumatism….Mace help digestion in stomach weakness…but if used in excess may cause over-excitement…They increase circulation and body heat….They have been employed in pestilential and putrid fevers….and with other substances in intermittent fevers…and enter into the composition of many French medicaments…so be a little careful…

As for the way it looks…Mace is basically dried…crimson-coloured….lacy seed covering (that is what is called aril) removed from the nutmeg…which is enclosed in a peach-like fruit….It comes from the Moluccas….

Its odour and taste are highly aromatic and spicy…Postharvest air-drying renders mace hornlike…brittle and waxy…In its commercial forms…mace is pressed flat and dried or ground…

The term spice is used to refer to plant parts which serve to improve the odour and flavour of foods…They contain essential oils and other ingredients which have a strong seasoning action…

Spices are processed…cleaned…graded and carefully packaged for overseas dispatch in the countries where they are cultivated…They are dried to preserve them for transport and storage…In consumer countries…they are delivered to spice mills…where they are cleaned and graded again…ready for sale in ungrounded or ground form…

Build your faith stronger…check the reference links…

  1. Mace info by www.drugs.com
  2. Mace and nutmeg fruit by Spices
  3. Mace by Mrs.M.Grieve

Say Goodbye To Painful Piles – Mace Oil

As a matter of fact…Piles is generally used as a loose common term to include piles, haemorrhoids…fistulas and fissures with skin tags…which in reality is not the case to a certain extent…

I’ll clarify your doubts…Fistulas are basically an abnormal small opening next to the anus from where discharge keeps occurring…This is due to a tunnel like tract between the anal canal and the skin….

Also understand that fissure with skin tags lead to painful bleeding due to a small cut at the anal margin….It is usually associated with skin tags that are mistakenly called piles….This condition resolves in majority of the patients by use of creams and medicines to treat constipation…Skin tags can sometimes be a source of great irritation due to micro-incontinence….

And now for your doubt…Piles…the real ones are those that are present with painless BLEEDING due to swelling up of blood vessels in the anal canal…you know there might be blood in your stool…you can see it when you excrete…it might be painless at the time when you do…but it can be painful to see that red liquid in the faeces..

Mace essential Oil To Rescue

Heard of Mace oil or Nutmeg or Mystica Fragrans or Jaiphal?

Well…I would say it is time for you to say goodbye to those bitter tablets…go the natural way…the way our great grand parents did…

This Mace oil is always used in foods…especially in desserts in India…Okay that has nothing to do with piles…but was just telling you…hmm…It is considered as a precious herb because of the enormous medicinal properties of its seeds…Cure for numerous problems…just one of them being piles…

The most important quality in the use of Mace…as a small dose it does not produce any side effects….when you use it for a problem like piles…Effects of Mace include a narcotic effect when taken in large doses….so be a little careful while handling…Use it in optimum amounts…

Mace is

  • Aromatic
  • Stimulant
  • sleep inducing
  • carminative
  • intoxicating
  • digestive tonic
  • an aphrodisiac
  • A relief from piles

Islamic scholars from historical times described Mace as stimulating…intoxicating…digestive tonic and as an aphrodisiac…Like I just mentioned…. Dr. Paracelsus Loni cerus and Mathiolus in their research on Mace described it as a gastric tonic..and a natural and herbal medicine for piles

It encourages appetite and averts constipation…fights gallstones and is also a tonic for the reproductive system…while regulating scanty periods…relieving frigidity and impotence…It can aid births by strengthening contractions…and relieve from the pain of piles…

Check out our reference links…

  1. Nutmeg by Dr.Veena Deo
  2. Nutrition Facts by power Your Diet
  3. All about mace by Spice Pages

Mace Oil Targets The Throbbing Head

Frankly a lot of effective medicines are being sold in the market to target headaches…but you know what! Even in times like now…the fittest and lasting survivors are those who respect and use the bounties of nature even for the most minor of ills…

Mace essential oil…I don’t know if you have heard about it before…But I am here to tell you of the magic of this amazing oil…

Nothing serves as a better refuge from headaches than this natural..this nature’s pet…Mace essential oil…

Let me enlighten you about this liquid…Nutmeg oil is also extracted from Myristica fragrans of the myristicaceae family and the oil is distilled from the dried seeds…The oil is colourless or light yellow and smells and tastes of nutmeg….
This warming spicy essential oil is used in aroma therapy to fight inflammations and muscle as well as rheumatic pain…while assisting the digestive system and supporting the reproductive system…and at the same time stimulating and invigorating the mind…Isn’t that an unusual quality of the oil?

Read on..

Using Mace oil can make aromatherapy treatments for headaches to heat in a diffuser… drizzle in a bath…massage directly onto your temples or wear as a perfume….Mace essential oil acts as a general headache remedy…

Mace (basically the outer covering) both contain myristicin…a substance that can cause drowsiness…(warm milk and grated nutmeg at bedtime will promote sleep)…When taken in moderation they may alleviate nausea…vomiting…flatulence and diarrhoea…but taken in large quantities they become toxic… 

Here a fantastic quick remedy of headache for you…

Sterilize a 6-oz. dark glass bottle….Place the bottle and lid in small pot of water and heat the water to a rolling boil….After boiling for at least a minute…turn off the heat and allow the water to cool….Once at a comfortable temperature…remove the bottle and led and leave them upside down to dry….

Measure carefully into the bottle 30 drops of Mace essential oil….depending on your type of headache….On top…pour 4 tbsp. of sweet almond oil…1 tbsp. of jojoba oil and 1 tsp. of vitamin E oil…

Lastly Cap the bottle and shake it gently….Use the remedy now if you like…but make sure that the oils blend properly by shaking the bottle 2 or 3 times each day for the first 3 days…

Nice no? Quickly check out our reference links for more such recipes…

  1. Nutmeg and Mace by helpwithcooking.com
  2. Recipe for headache by ehow
  3. Mace by Herbs and Spices

Come…Be A Part Of Mace Oil’s Spa

Rarely when a working woman or a man gets a day off…either the day is spent gorging on junk…being a couch potato…and for the ones who love themselves a little more than others…they spend the day thoroughly pampering themselves…physically I mean…

These are the times…when usually I seek refuge in essential oils…to bathe…to simply apply or to have this little spa of my own…

Mace essential can offer a lot to such pampering-seekers…Read on…

Mace essential oil has been used for centuries…particularly as a remedy for kidney and digestive problems…Mace oil is obtained from an evergreen tree of the Myristicaeae plant family….The tree of this grows up to sixty five feet in height with small…yellow flowers and fruit…almost shaped like a small peach…the bark of the tree is smooth and gray-brown in colour…It is native to the Molucca Islands and cultivated in-

  • West Indies
  • Indonesia
  • Sri Lanka

I’ll tell you a brief history of this soothing oil…Ancient Indian and Chinese royalty carried ground nutmeg in small…ivory boxes and added the substance to drinks for hallucinogenic reasons…in Malaysia…pregnant women used nutmeg in the final weeks of their confinement in the belief it would strengthen the uterine muscle for labour…The Romans used nutmeg to make incense…

Initially Mace was a valuable spice for trading…both the British and the French smuggled nutmeg seeds in the eighteenth century….By the nineteenth century…Mace was being used in many English recipes…it became a popular addition to Christmas eggnog in the United States…

You the extraction of this oil is rather easy…It is obtained the outer layer of the fruit called nutmeg…it is extracted by steam distillation of the kernel seed…Nutmeg oil is primarily made up of the chemical component of monoterpenes hydrocarbons  but also includes geraniol…borneol and linalool

Aromatherapy And Mace Oil

Mace oil has a warm…spicy…sharp aroma…it has a number of properties such as-

  • Analgesic
  • Antiseptic
  • Digestive
  • An aphrodisiac
  • Stimulant
  • Tonic
  • Anti-oxidant

In aromatherapy…Mace oil is used in the treatment of a number of conditions…it is used to treat arthritis….gout…rheumatism…poor circulation…indigestion…constipation…flatulence…nausea…nervous fatigue and anxiety…

Also Mace oil is also used as a flavouring agent in pharmaceuticals…Not only that…it is used in soaps…cosmetics…perfumes….detergents and lotions….Mace oil is also used interchangeably with nutmeg and is found in many colognes and perfumes…particularly fragrances for men…mace is also found in many foods and drinks…both alcoholic and non-alcoholic….

Now…have a look at our reference links…

  1. Essential oil by Aromatherapy Library
  2. Mace by Daniele Ryman
  3. Nutmeg oil by bpb

Mace Oil – At Your Service

Mace essential oil is one amazing essential oil that works for about ill of humans and in some cases even of cats and dogs…The oil has a great reputation among manufacturers of the essential oils…

Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) has been used for centuries, particularly as a remedy for kidney and digestive problems; Nutmeg oil is obtained from an evergreen tree of the Myristicaeae plant family. The tree grows up to sixty five feet in height with small, yellow flowers and fruit, shaped like a small peach; the bark of the tree is smooth and gray-brown in color. It is native to the Molucca Islands and cultivated in the West Indies, Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

It is dried seed of the nutmeg tree fruit which belongs to the genus Myristica. It is a tiny package with various big benefits. It is used for medicinal purpose and also for culinary purpose. Nutmeg is also recognized as –

  • Jaiphal
  • Myristica
  • Muscdier
  • Myristica fragrans
  • Mace
  • Noz moscada
  • Magic
  • Muskatbaum
  • Nuez moscada
  • Nux moschata

Nutmeg tree grows in Malaysia, Indonesia, West Indies and SriLanka as well as produce both nutmeg and mace. Mace is the lacy reddish membrane of the seed which is also used as the spice.

Ancient Indian and Chinese royalty carried ground Nutmeg in small, ivory boxes and added the substance to drinks for hallucinogenic reasons; in Malaysia, pregnant women used Nutmeg in the final weeks of their confinement in the belief it would strengthen the uterine muscle for labor. The Romans used Nutmeg to make incense.

Nutmeg was considered to be a valuable spice for trading; both the British and the French smuggled Nutmeg seeds in the eighteenth century. By the nineteenth century, ground Nutmeg was being used in many English recipes; it became a popular addition to Christmas eggnog in the United States.

Nutmeg oil is obtained from the kernel of the fruit and the outer layer of the fruit also produces another spice, Mace; the essential oil of Nutmeg is extracted by steam distillation of the kernel seed. Nutmeg oil is primarily made up of the chemical component of monoterpenes hydrocarbons (including camphene, dipentene, pinene, sabinene and cymene) but also includes geraniol, borneol and linalol.
Alright, have a look at our reference links now…

  1. Mace Spice by India Net Zone
  2. Mace Spice by Wise Geek
  3. Mace Substitute by about.com

Mace – The Ace Oil

Mace essential oil, another wonder of the earth. Though it isn’t counted amongst the 7 wonders of the earth, but trust me it’s no less. The oil has properties that can render even the most aware wonder-struck.

Ancient Indian and Chinese royalty carried ground Nutmeg in small, ivory boxes and added the substance to drinks for hallucinogenic reasons; in Malaysia, pregnant women used Nutmeg in the final weeks of their confinement in the belief it would strengthen the uterine muscle for labor. The Romans used Nutmeg to make incense.

Nutmeg was considered to be a valuable spice for trading; both the British and the French smuggled Nutmeg seeds in the eighteenth century. By the nineteenth century, ground Nutmeg was being used in many English recipes; it became a popular addition to Christmas eggnog in the United States.

Mace the tree is a small evergreen, not more than 40 feet in height, with smooth, grayish-brown bark, green on the younger branches. The alternate leaves are oblong-ovate, acute, entire, smooth, and dark-green. The flowers are very small and unisexual. The fruits, smooth and yellow, resemble a pear grooved by a longitudinal furrow and containing a single erect seed about 1 1/4 inches long. The nucleus being the wrinkled nutmeg. The fleshy, irregular covering, scarlet when fresh and drying, yellow and brittle, is the mace. The essential oil is made by steam (or water) distillation of the dried orange-brown aril or husk.

The Properties of this oil being –

  • Analgesic
  • Anti-emetic
  • Antioxidant
  • Antiseptic
  • Antispasmodic
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Carminative
  • Digestive
  • Emmenagogue
  • Larvicidal
  • Stimulant
  • Tonic

Mace essential oil, can be used for flatulent dyspepsia, nausea, diarrhea, dysentery and rheumatism. Both Mace and Nutmeg help digestion in stomach weakness, but if used in excess may cause over-excitement. They increase circulation and body heat. They have been employed in pestilential and putrid fevers, and with other substances in intermittent fevers, and enter into the composition of many French medicaments.

Mace essential oil, Myristica fragrans,  blends well with the following essential oils: oak moss, lavandin, bay leaf, Peru balsam, orange, Geranium, clary sage, rosemary, lime, petitgrain, mandarin, coriander, and other spice oils.

Cautions – Mace is generally non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing. However, used in large doses there may be signs of toxicity such as nausea, stupor, and tachycardia, believed to be due to the myristcin content.

Alright, have a look at our reference links –

  1. Mace Essential Oil by About
  2. Mace Spice by Wise Geek
  3. Mace Oil by Net

Mace Essential Oil’s Therapeutic Help

Mace essential oil is one amazing therapeutic oil that not much to do with any kind of artificiality, in the sense that the oil obatined from it is absolutely pure and harmless and highly potent. It is used in India as an integral spice of every dish.

Nutmeg oil is obtained from the kernel of the fruit and the outer layer of the fruit also produces another spice called mace; nutmeg essential oil is extracted by steam distillation of the kernel seed. Nutmeg oil is primarily made up of the chemical component of monoterpenes hydrocarbons (including camphene, dipentene, pinene, sabinene and cymene) but also includes geraniol, borneol and linalol.

Nutmeg oil has a warm, spicy, sharp aroma; it has a number of properties such as analgesic, antiseptic, digestive, an aphrodisiac, stimulant, tonic and anti-oxidant. In aromatherapy, nutmeg is used in the treatment of a number of conditions; it is used to treat -

  • Arthritis
  • Gout
  • Rheumatism
  • Poor circulation
  • Indigestion
  • Constipation
  • Flatulence
  • Nausea
  • Nervous fatigue
  • Anxiety

Nutmeg is also used as a flavoring agent in pharmaceuticals; it is used in soaps, cosmetics, perfumes, detergents and lotions. Mace oil is also used interchangeably with nutmeg and is found in many colognes and perfumes, particularly fragrances for men; mace is also found in many foods and drinks, both alcoholic and non-alcoholic.

Fragrant rich nutmeg is one of the highly prized spices known since antiquity for its aromatic, aphrodisiac, and curative properties. Nutmegs are evergreen trees, native to the rain forest Indonesian Moluccas Island, also known as the Spice Islands.

Botanically, the plant belongs to Myristicaceae family and known as Myristica fragrans. Several species grown all over the world other than Myristica species, such as M. argentea, M. malabarica (Indian), and M. fatua, are rather similar to M. fragrans in appearance; however, they have less intense flavor and aroma.

The spice tree is a large evergreen plant that thrives well under tropical climates. A fully-grown tree reaches about 50-60 feet in height and is the source of nutmeg and mace, two valuable spices. The nutmeg fruit, in fact, is a drupe, about the size of an apricot, which when ripen splits up to reveal single centrally situated oval shaped hard kernel known as “nutmeg spice”. The seed is closely enveloped by crimson-red colored lacy or thread like arils known as “mace”. Both spices have similar warm, sweet aromatic flavor.

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Mace info by www.drugs.com
  2. Mace and nutmeg fruit by Spices
  3. Mace by Mrs.M.Grieve

Mace Oil – Info Barrel

What I read was that the spice mace has a similar flavor to nutmeg and is made from the outer covering of the nutmeg shell…Although the spices come from the same plant…mace is more expensive due to lower-yield volume…Mace is more potent then nutmeg and is often used as a nutmeg substitute in lesser quantities…Like nutmeg…mace contains the essential oils

  • Myristicin
  • Elemicin

And even are mildly hallucinogenic in large quantities…Historically…mace was used to aid digestion…stimulate appetite…relieve nausea and treat aches and pains
I’ll tell you certain facts about it…

Nutmeg has been and still is considered to be a useful medicine in a number of Asian societies….Also among the Arabs it has been used to treat digestive problems and highly  valued as an aphrodisiac….that basically is…it creates the initial spark to make you go down to do the real act…In clearer language…it turns you on…rather…it has the ability to do so…

Indians used it to combat asthma and heart complaints and still use it as a sedative….you know something that just eases you down…soothes you…

Coming back to its property of it being an aphrodisiac…Nicholas Culpeper (1616-54)…the famous English herbalist…attributes to nutmeg the capacity to induce sleep delirium…Also…William Salmon…on the other hand…said that the oil of mace or nutmegs…if rubbed on the genitals…instigated one to be turned on (remember the Arabs’ use of its aphrodisiac qualities)…

It was considered to be having kind of magical properties and is also one of the ingredients of a magical perfume described in the most famous of all the grimoires…or black books of the sorcerers…The Key of Solomon the King….The use of nutmeg as a magical medicine continued far into the twentieth century in England….It was a certain belief that carrying nutmeg in the pocket could cure various complaints has been recorded from various parts of the country….

Note this…In places like Yorkshire it was considered as the best way to relieve rheumatic pain…in Lincolnshire it was said to cure backache and in Devon it was eaten to clear up boils…Elsewhere it was used by gardeners as a prophylactic measure against the occupational hazard of backache….Wow! I am always a victim of it…of great use to me at least…

Anyway…As late as 1966 a Hampshire coalman who suffered from lumbago was told to carry nutmeg…and when he did so he swore he never suffered from it again…Nutmeg was also believed to be lucky in gambling…There was this  newspaper article from the mid-1960s that apparently reported that an individual sprinkled nutmeg powder on their football pools coupon and…on the advice of a gypsy…left it for twenty-four hours before posting it….

Although Mace essential oil has been demoted to a ‘pseudo-hallucinogen’ by many authorities, a self-experiment by Paul Devereux…a writer on the alignments of prehistoric sites…seems to indicate that its psychoactive effects can nevertheless be quite dramatic… In July 1989 Devereux took two level teaspoons of ground nutmeg and then went to bed…sprinkling nutmeg essential oil on his pillow and sheets…When he had been asleep for a few hours he had a dream in which he was travelling down a tunnel and flying at ever increasing speeds. He became fully conscious when in full flight and travelled over a landscape. During the flight he passed close to a tree and snatched at its leaves…feeling ‘the pull of the branches and the foliage digging into my hand’….In other words the tactile sense was fully operative. He decided to terminate the journey by retracing his path and arriving back at his starting point…and opened his eyes…His hallucinations were thus both visual and tactile but he experienced no auditory or olfactory sensations during the experience…Isn’t that eerie…yet interesting?

For more such information…go through our reference links…

  1. Nutmeg by Richard Rudgley
  2. Mace as aphrodisiac by bpb
  3. Spices by Alexandra Senyo