Mace Oil Against Infections

There are various healing and curing oils available in the market, not at all pricey. People use them and in a way, are satisfied. Most poeple ask me “ why use essential oils when we are kind of satisfies with the regular chemical based oils”. There’s a lot that cansaid in answer to this question, read on.

Since ancient times nutmeg and its oil were being used in Chinese and Indian traditional medicines for illnesses related to the nervous and digestive systems. The compounds in this spice such as myristicin and elemicin have been found to have stimulant properties on brain.

Nutmeg oil contains eugenol, which has been used in dentistry for toothache relief. The oil is also used as a local massage to reduce muscular pain and rheumatic pain of joints.

Freshly prepared decoction with honey mix has been used to relief of -

  • Nausea
  • Gastritis
  • Indigestion ailments

The trees which produce both nutmeg and mace are large evergreens native to the Moluccas but which are now grown elsewhere in the tropics, notably Grenada in the West Indies. The trees can reach a height of 18-24 m (60-80 ft), and are either male or female. One male per ten to twelve female trees is the norm in plantations, resulting in them being known as harem trees!

The trees do not flower or fruit until about eight or nine years old (thus cannot be sexed until then) and yield about 100 fruits; by the time they are 30 years old, they can yield an average crop of 3 – 4,000 fruit a year. Trees (Myristica fragrans) can bear for a good 70 years.

Yellowish flowers are followed by large yellow apricot- or plum-like fruits. When they split open, these reveal the black seed (the nutmeg) wrapped in its red lacy aril (the mace). Both spices are dried separately, and the major producers are the Moluccas and Grenada, the latter exporting some 2,000 tonnes to the US each year. Nutmeg has always been more available and popular than mace, which is much more expensive; this is not surprising as mace equals one-fifth of the weight of the whole seed, and only 75 g (3 oz) mace are gained from 100 nutmegs.

Go through these reference links now -

  1. Mace info by www.drugs.com
  2. Mace and nutmeg fruit by Spices
  3. Mace by Mrs.M.Grieve

Mace Oil – A Traditional Medicine

Mace essential oil is an amazing traditonal medicinal oil that has enjoyed a wonderful repution in the Indian market in the past and now is enjoying the same worldwide. All the ones who use it are already aware of the amazing spiced recipes this herb and its oil is used in.

Nutmeg tree yields up to three times in a season. Once harvested from the tree, the outer coat or husk is removed. The aril, also known as “mace”, is gently peeled off from the outer surface of the kernel, flattened into strips, dried, and sold either as whole strips or finely ground. The whole kernels are then sun-dried for several days to weeks, or sometimes, more rapidly over a hot drier machine until the whole nutmeg rattle inside the shell.

The shell is then broken and shriveled nutmeg kernel is taken out. Finally, nuts are dipped in limewater in order to prevent insect infestation and seed germination.

Nutmeg spice as well as mace contains many plant derived chemical compounds that are known to have anti-oxidant, disease preventing, and health promoting properties.

The spicy nut contains fixed oil trimyristin and many essential volatile oils such as which gives sweet aromatic flavor to nutmeg like myristicin, elemicin, eugenol and safrole. The other volatile oils are pinene, camphene, dipentene, cineole, linalool, sabinene, safrole, terpeniol.

The active principles in nutmeg have many therapeutic applications in many traditional medicines as -

  • Anti-fungal
  • Anti-depressant
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Digestive
  • Carminative functions

This prized spice is a good source of minerals like copper, potassium, calcium, manganese, iron, zinc and magnesium. Potassium is an important component of cell and body fluids that helps control heart rate and blood pressure. Manganese and copper are used by the body as co-factors for the antioxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Iron is essential for red blood cell production and as a co-factor for cytochrome oxidases enzymes.

It is also rich in many vital B-complex vitamins including vitamin C, folic acid, riboflavin, niacin, vitamin A and many flavonoid anti-oxidants like beta-carotene and cryptoxanthins that are essential for optimum health.

Since ancient times nutmeg and its oil were being used in Chinese and Indian traditional medicines for illnesses related to the nervous and digestive systems. The compounds in this spice such as myristicin and elemicin have been found to have stimulant properties on brain.

Go through our reference links now -

  1. Mace info by www.drugs.com
  2. Mace and nutmeg fruit by Spices
  3. Mace by Mrs.M.Grieve