Mace Oil – At Your Service

Mace essential oil is one amazing essential oil that works for about ill of humans and in some cases even of cats and dogs…The oil has a great reputation among manufacturers of the essential oils…

Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans) has been used for centuries, particularly as a remedy for kidney and digestive problems; Nutmeg oil is obtained from an evergreen tree of the Myristicaeae plant family. The tree grows up to sixty five feet in height with small, yellow flowers and fruit, shaped like a small peach; the bark of the tree is smooth and gray-brown in color. It is native to the Molucca Islands and cultivated in the West Indies, Indonesia and Sri Lanka.

It is dried seed of the nutmeg tree fruit which belongs to the genus Myristica. It is a tiny package with various big benefits. It is used for medicinal purpose and also for culinary purpose. Nutmeg is also recognized as –

  • Jaiphal
  • Myristica
  • Muscdier
  • Myristica fragrans
  • Mace
  • Noz moscada
  • Magic
  • Muskatbaum
  • Nuez moscada
  • Nux moschata

Nutmeg tree grows in Malaysia, Indonesia, West Indies and SriLanka as well as produce both nutmeg and mace. Mace is the lacy reddish membrane of the seed which is also used as the spice.

Ancient Indian and Chinese royalty carried ground Nutmeg in small, ivory boxes and added the substance to drinks for hallucinogenic reasons; in Malaysia, pregnant women used Nutmeg in the final weeks of their confinement in the belief it would strengthen the uterine muscle for labor. The Romans used Nutmeg to make incense.

Nutmeg was considered to be a valuable spice for trading; both the British and the French smuggled Nutmeg seeds in the eighteenth century. By the nineteenth century, ground Nutmeg was being used in many English recipes; it became a popular addition to Christmas eggnog in the United States.

Nutmeg oil is obtained from the kernel of the fruit and the outer layer of the fruit also produces another spice, Mace; the essential oil of Nutmeg is extracted by steam distillation of the kernel seed. Nutmeg oil is primarily made up of the chemical component of monoterpenes hydrocarbons (including camphene, dipentene, pinene, sabinene and cymene) but also includes geraniol, borneol and linalol.
Alright, have a look at our reference links now…

  1. Mace Spice by India Net Zone
  2. Mace Spice by Wise Geek
  3. Mace Substitute by about.com

Mace – The Ace Oil

Mace essential oil, another wonder of the earth. Though it isn’t counted amongst the 7 wonders of the earth, but trust me it’s no less. The oil has properties that can render even the most aware wonder-struck.

Ancient Indian and Chinese royalty carried ground Nutmeg in small, ivory boxes and added the substance to drinks for hallucinogenic reasons; in Malaysia, pregnant women used Nutmeg in the final weeks of their confinement in the belief it would strengthen the uterine muscle for labor. The Romans used Nutmeg to make incense.

Nutmeg was considered to be a valuable spice for trading; both the British and the French smuggled Nutmeg seeds in the eighteenth century. By the nineteenth century, ground Nutmeg was being used in many English recipes; it became a popular addition to Christmas eggnog in the United States.

Mace the tree is a small evergreen, not more than 40 feet in height, with smooth, grayish-brown bark, green on the younger branches. The alternate leaves are oblong-ovate, acute, entire, smooth, and dark-green. The flowers are very small and unisexual. The fruits, smooth and yellow, resemble a pear grooved by a longitudinal furrow and containing a single erect seed about 1 1/4 inches long. The nucleus being the wrinkled nutmeg. The fleshy, irregular covering, scarlet when fresh and drying, yellow and brittle, is the mace. The essential oil is made by steam (or water) distillation of the dried orange-brown aril or husk.

The Properties of this oil being –

  • Analgesic
  • Anti-emetic
  • Antioxidant
  • Antiseptic
  • Antispasmodic
  • Aphrodisiac
  • Carminative
  • Digestive
  • Emmenagogue
  • Larvicidal
  • Stimulant
  • Tonic

Mace essential oil, can be used for flatulent dyspepsia, nausea, diarrhea, dysentery and rheumatism. Both Mace and Nutmeg help digestion in stomach weakness, but if used in excess may cause over-excitement. They increase circulation and body heat. They have been employed in pestilential and putrid fevers, and with other substances in intermittent fevers, and enter into the composition of many French medicaments.

Mace essential oil, Myristica fragrans,  blends well with the following essential oils: oak moss, lavandin, bay leaf, Peru balsam, orange, Geranium, clary sage, rosemary, lime, petitgrain, mandarin, coriander, and other spice oils.

Cautions – Mace is generally non-toxic, non-irritant and non-sensitizing. However, used in large doses there may be signs of toxicity such as nausea, stupor, and tachycardia, believed to be due to the myristcin content.

Alright, have a look at our reference links –

  1. Mace Essential Oil by About
  2. Mace Spice by Wise Geek
  3. Mace Oil by Net

Mace Oil – Ample Benefits In Store

A fine fact is that…this powder is available almost everywhere…You can find mace in almost all the grocery stores…containing spices…Also check supermarkets and food malls…It is generally available in glass bottles in powdered form or as a whole or in small pieces….Another valuable tip for you…While buying…check for the crispy nature and the red or orange intense colour of the mace…The mace powder if brown in colour…check for any lump formation in it….

This Mace powder is one amazing thing I tell you…it is used to flavour cakes and other sweets…but mace is also used in many savoury dishes…These include

  • Meats
  • Sauces
  • Curries
  • Pickling
  • Ketchup
  • Worcestershire sauce

Mace can be in fact it IS used as a nutmeg substitute in most recipes….Reason being this spice is sweeter and milder…than anything else at it’s competition…

Also mace is often used in place of nutmeg when dark coloured flecks of nutmeg might ruin the appearance of certain dishes….C’mon you can well understand that not so tempting looking dishes…no matter how tasty…can repel the eaters…and gawkers…Whereas often the most nicely garnished and nicely served and coloured dishes…attract the maximum masses and most of the times they deceivingly turn out to be puke-inducing…Anyway…back to the topic…Ground mace can be substituted in light coloured sauces…clear broths…omelettes and mashed potatoes…

Take two useful tips from me..

  1. One tip I would give you is that…Crush or grind whole mace before use to release its essential oils…flavour…& aroma…
  2. Also….Add it at the begin of the cooking process to allow its full flavour to come out…and spread…

Hmm…enough of information now….have a look at our references now…

  1. Spice Substitution Chart by about.com
  2. Mace Powder Recipes by Yummly
  3. Herbs and Spices by apinchof.com

Lets Care For Ourselves – Lets Use Mace Oil

Since ancient times nutmeg and its oil were being used in Chinese and Indian traditional medicines for illnesses related to the nervous and digestive systems. The compounds in this spice such as myristicin and elemicin have been found to have stimulant properties on brain.

Nutmeg oil contains eugenol, which has been used in dentistry for toothache relief. The oil is also used as a local massage to reduce muscular pain and rheumatic pain of joints.

Freshly prepared decoction with honey mix has been used to relief of -

  • Nausea
  • Gastritis
  • Indigestion ailments

The trees which produce both nutmeg and mace are large evergreens native to the Moluccas but which are now grown elsewhere in the tropics, notably Grenada in the West Indies. The trees can reach a height of 18-24 m (60-80 ft), and are either male or female. One male per ten to twelve female trees is the norm in plantations, resulting in them being known as harem trees!

The trees do not flower or fruit until about eight or nine years old (thus cannot be sexed until then) and yield about 100 fruits; by the time they are 30 years old, they can yield an average crop of 3 – 4,000 fruit a year. Trees (Myristica fragrans) can bear for a good 70 years.

Yellowish flowers are followed by large yellow apricot- or plum-like fruits. When they split open, these reveal the black seed (the nutmeg) wrapped in its red lacy aril (the mace). Both spices are dried separately, and the major producers are the Moluccas and Grenada, the latter exporting some 2,000 tonnes to the US each year. Nutmeg has always been more available and popular than mace, which is much more expensive; this is not surprising as mace equals one-fifth of the weight of the whole seed, and only 75 g (3 oz) mace are gained from 100 nutmegs.

Go through these reference links now -

  1. Mace info by www.drugs.com
  2. Mace and nutmeg fruit by Spices
  3. Mace by Mrs.M.Grieve