Mace Oil – Info Barrel

What I read was that the spice mace has a similar flavor to nutmeg and is made from the outer covering of the nutmeg shell…Although the spices come from the same plant…mace is more expensive due to lower-yield volume…Mace is more potent then nutmeg and is often used as a nutmeg substitute in lesser quantities…Like nutmeg…mace contains the essential oils

  • Myristicin
  • Elemicin

And even are mildly hallucinogenic in large quantities…Historically…mace was used to aid digestion…stimulate appetite…relieve nausea and treat aches and pains
I’ll tell you certain facts about it…

Nutmeg has been and still is considered to be a useful medicine in a number of Asian societies….Also among the Arabs it has been used to treat digestive problems and highly  valued as an aphrodisiac….that basically is…it creates the initial spark to make you go down to do the real act…In clearer language…it turns you on…rather…it has the ability to do so…

Indians used it to combat asthma and heart complaints and still use it as a sedative….you know something that just eases you down…soothes you…

Coming back to its property of it being an aphrodisiac…Nicholas Culpeper (1616-54)…the famous English herbalist…attributes to nutmeg the capacity to induce sleep delirium…Also…William Salmon…on the other hand…said that the oil of mace or nutmegs…if rubbed on the genitals…instigated one to be turned on (remember the Arabs’ use of its aphrodisiac qualities)…

It was considered to be having kind of magical properties and is also one of the ingredients of a magical perfume described in the most famous of all the grimoires…or black books of the sorcerers…The Key of Solomon the King….The use of nutmeg as a magical medicine continued far into the twentieth century in England….It was a certain belief that carrying nutmeg in the pocket could cure various complaints has been recorded from various parts of the country….

Note this…In places like Yorkshire it was considered as the best way to relieve rheumatic pain…in Lincolnshire it was said to cure backache and in Devon it was eaten to clear up boils…Elsewhere it was used by gardeners as a prophylactic measure against the occupational hazard of backache….Wow! I am always a victim of it…of great use to me at least…

Anyway…As late as 1966 a Hampshire coalman who suffered from lumbago was told to carry nutmeg…and when he did so he swore he never suffered from it again…Nutmeg was also believed to be lucky in gambling…There was this  newspaper article from the mid-1960s that apparently reported that an individual sprinkled nutmeg powder on their football pools coupon and…on the advice of a gypsy…left it for twenty-four hours before posting it….

Although Mace essential oil has been demoted to a ‘pseudo-hallucinogen’ by many authorities, a self-experiment by Paul Devereux…a writer on the alignments of prehistoric sites…seems to indicate that its psychoactive effects can nevertheless be quite dramatic… In July 1989 Devereux took two level teaspoons of ground nutmeg and then went to bed…sprinkling nutmeg essential oil on his pillow and sheets…When he had been asleep for a few hours he had a dream in which he was travelling down a tunnel and flying at ever increasing speeds. He became fully conscious when in full flight and travelled over a landscape. During the flight he passed close to a tree and snatched at its leaves…feeling ‘the pull of the branches and the foliage digging into my hand’….In other words the tactile sense was fully operative. He decided to terminate the journey by retracing his path and arriving back at his starting point…and opened his eyes…His hallucinations were thus both visual and tactile but he experienced no auditory or olfactory sensations during the experience…Isn’t that eerie…yet interesting?

For more such information…go through our reference links…

  1. Nutmeg by Richard Rudgley
  2. Mace as aphrodisiac by bpb
  3. Spices by Alexandra Senyo

Mace Oil – Ample Benefits In Store

A fine fact is that…this powder is available almost everywhere…You can find mace in almost all the grocery stores…containing spices…Also check supermarkets and food malls…It is generally available in glass bottles in powdered form or as a whole or in small pieces….Another valuable tip for you…While buying…check for the crispy nature and the red or orange intense colour of the mace…The mace powder if brown in colour…check for any lump formation in it….

This Mace powder is one amazing thing I tell you…it is used to flavour cakes and other sweets…but mace is also used in many savoury dishes…These include

  • Meats
  • Sauces
  • Curries
  • Pickling
  • Ketchup
  • Worcestershire sauce

Mace can be in fact it IS used as a nutmeg substitute in most recipes….Reason being this spice is sweeter and milder…than anything else at it’s competition…

Also mace is often used in place of nutmeg when dark coloured flecks of nutmeg might ruin the appearance of certain dishes….C’mon you can well understand that not so tempting looking dishes…no matter how tasty…can repel the eaters…and gawkers…Whereas often the most nicely garnished and nicely served and coloured dishes…attract the maximum masses and most of the times they deceivingly turn out to be puke-inducing…Anyway…back to the topic…Ground mace can be substituted in light coloured sauces…clear broths…omelettes and mashed potatoes…

Take two useful tips from me..

  1. One tip I would give you is that…Crush or grind whole mace before use to release its essential oils…flavour…& aroma…
  2. Also….Add it at the begin of the cooking process to allow its full flavour to come out…and spread…

Hmm…enough of information now….have a look at our references now…

  1. Spice Substitution Chart by about.com
  2. Mace Powder Recipes by Yummly
  3. Herbs and Spices by apinchof.com

Lets Care For Ourselves – Lets Use Mace Oil

Since ancient times nutmeg and its oil were being used in Chinese and Indian traditional medicines for illnesses related to the nervous and digestive systems. The compounds in this spice such as myristicin and elemicin have been found to have stimulant properties on brain.

Nutmeg oil contains eugenol, which has been used in dentistry for toothache relief. The oil is also used as a local massage to reduce muscular pain and rheumatic pain of joints.

Freshly prepared decoction with honey mix has been used to relief of -

  • Nausea
  • Gastritis
  • Indigestion ailments

The trees which produce both nutmeg and mace are large evergreens native to the Moluccas but which are now grown elsewhere in the tropics, notably Grenada in the West Indies. The trees can reach a height of 18-24 m (60-80 ft), and are either male or female. One male per ten to twelve female trees is the norm in plantations, resulting in them being known as harem trees!

The trees do not flower or fruit until about eight or nine years old (thus cannot be sexed until then) and yield about 100 fruits; by the time they are 30 years old, they can yield an average crop of 3 – 4,000 fruit a year. Trees (Myristica fragrans) can bear for a good 70 years.

Yellowish flowers are followed by large yellow apricot- or plum-like fruits. When they split open, these reveal the black seed (the nutmeg) wrapped in its red lacy aril (the mace). Both spices are dried separately, and the major producers are the Moluccas and Grenada, the latter exporting some 2,000 tonnes to the US each year. Nutmeg has always been more available and popular than mace, which is much more expensive; this is not surprising as mace equals one-fifth of the weight of the whole seed, and only 75 g (3 oz) mace are gained from 100 nutmegs.

Go through these reference links now -

  1. Mace info by www.drugs.com
  2. Mace and nutmeg fruit by Spices
  3. Mace by Mrs.M.Grieve